Eco Fashion, A to V

pewter leather clutch against white backgroundYou’ve read about fast fashion, in which underpaid workers in third-world countries provide western consumers with cheap and disposable goods. You’re all clear on cotton, which uses 17% of the world’s insecticides and is 94% Genetically Modified. But with that in mind, sometimes you just have to shop—and many of those times take place during the holidays. Which is why it makes sense now to figure out what matters to you when it comes to the clothes that you buy. Here’s how I categorize eco fashion. [Read more…]

Shop Drop Challenge, By The Numbers

woman smiling with face in handsEditor’s Note: Check out the 2016 Shop Drop Challenge!

Thanks from the bottom of my heart to everyone who supported the Shop Drop Challenge. By now, you’ve heard ad nauseum how much money the average American woman spends on clothes, and how much textile waste she dumps into the landfill. With this in mind, here’s what happened in 30 days this month:

513 women joined the Shop Drop Challenge.
We saved $30,780.
We diverted 3,078 pounds of landfill waste.

Amazing! But we also inspired our community to think beyond the mall when it comes to style. And that, my friends, was the point.

I want to make the Shop Drop Challenge an annual event. If we all got together for a yearly 30-day shopping pause, we could save nearly $10 billion and one billion pounds of landfill waste. Yes, that’s billion with a b. Who’s with me?

4 Rules of Thrift Shopping

brunette in black pants and shirt with red necklace on city sidewalkIf you’ve been following Mommy Greenest this month, you know we are in the thick of the 2014 Shop Drop Challenge, in which we’re creating a community of women who have pledged to buy no new clothes or accessories for the 30 days of January and are inspired to thrift and swap their style this month. This group is on the list for an exclusive party in Los Angeles later this month. Want to join us? Sign up!

I’ve been buying second-hand clothes pretty much exclusively for a few years now, and yes there are environmental benefits, but my reasons are mostly selfish: I’ve been able to upgrade my closet for a fraction of what I would pay in a store.

But for those of you who aren’t used to thrift store shopping, here are a few rules to remember. [Read more…]

Need A New Year’s Resolution? Shop Drop!

brunette wearing blue minidress and boots against red wallEditor’s Note 12.29.14: Did you stumble here? Check out this year’s Shop Drop Challenge!

Welcome to the 2014 Shop Drop Challenge! I am so excited to get this party started. We’re creating a community of women who have pledged to buy no new clothes or accessories in January this year. It’s the perfect resolution to save resources and money!

The average American woman spends $60 per month on clothes and dumps six pounds of textile waste into the trash. If we all got together, we could save nearly $10 billion and one billion pounds of landfill waste. Yes, that’s billion with a b.

Right now, there are nearly 400 of us committed to a shopping pause this month, representing a savings of $24,000 and 2,400 pounds of textile waste diverted from the landfill. Amazing! Will you please share this post with your friends, so we can double those numbers? Thank you! [Read more…]