2 Steps to Eliminate Food Dyes Linked to ADHD

adhd inducing food dyes in bright colored candyDo your kids get hyper after eating candy? It might not be the sugar—but could be the color. Studies have found a link between food dyes and hyperactivity in children.

Some even see a link between food dyes—which trigger the release of histamines, part of the body’s immune system—and allergies, as well as ADHD, which affects 5.2 million American children.

Yet in 2012, an FDA advisory committee determined that the science was too weak to support a ban on artificial food dyes or a warning label on foods that contain them.

Apparently, that’s not the case in Europe, where regulations require such a warning label, forcing European companies to substitute natural colors for dyes.

European candy require labels for food dyes linked to ADHD. Is this food discrimination?

For example, Nestle is phasing out artificial colors from their entire confectionery line in the U.K., but not the U.S. Looks like food discrimination to me, and the only ones losing are our kids.

In the United States, the only way to avoid artificial food dyes is to:

1. Buy USDA certified organic foods, which are guaranteed not to contain synthetic ingredients like food dyes.
2. If organic isn’t option, make sure to read ingredient labels carefully, keeping a watchful eye for Blue 1, Blue 2, Green 3, Red 40, Red 3, Yellow 5, and Yellow 6, especially.

This isn’t just true of candy. Food dyes are in everything, from cereal to lunch meat, so reading labels is super important–especially when you’re trying to keep your kids from bouncing off the walls.

No they’re not organic–yet–but UnReal candy brand does focus on fair trade. Keep an eye out in supermarkets for food dye free UnReal candies like Unreal Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups and Unreal Candy Coated Chocolates.

Yes, we want our kids to stay away from candy, but if they’re going to eat it occasionally, let’s make sure it’s food dye free.

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Comments

  1. Rachel Sarnoff says:

    Sure, thanks for reading!

  2. Artificial food dyes are bad, bad, bad. The FDA held hearings in 2011 and the vote was very close but did result in that more study is needed. The study (Lancet) should not have used both dyes and sodium benzoate as the challenge so it was said that was it the sodium benzoate OR the dyes that triggered the hyperactivity? As parents, we know that both are bad but in the UK, the fact that the study showed that ALL children are affected was enough to require warning labels on food with dyes. Here’s a link to the hearings by the Feingold Association (nonprofit parent group that helps families that avoid dyes, etd.) http://www.feingold.org/enews/04-2011.html

    • Rachel Sarnoff says:

      Really great info. Thanks for sharing, Jen! And thanks for reading. I’ll keep an eye out for your comments 🙂 Rachel

Trackbacks

  1. […] meals, try to reduce their BPA exposure by using more reusable water bottles and less canned foods, avoid food dyes and other artificial ingredients, pack their beach bags with zinc-based sunscreen, […]

  2. […] to do was make her worry even more that she was doing the wrong thing. So I didn’t talk about food dyes and hyperactivity, the studies linking pesticides to cancer or Dr. Alan Greene’s groundbreaking work on […]

  3. […] tongue bright red. My dad didn’t know about potential side effects like hives and seizures, or the links between food dyes and hyperactivity in children. Whenever I had a cough, he dosed me with a teaspoon every few hours until I was so woozy I slept […]

  4. […] that the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer found five synthetic flavor additives “possibly carcinogenic to humans,” and another two were determined to be “known […]

  5. […] their beloved mac ‘n cheese. This means American kids can get their cheesy noodles without artificial food dyes that have been linked to hyperactivity in children. They can eat cheesy noodles just like children in Europe, where mandatory food dye front-of-pack […]

  6. […] healthier for kids. Many egg dyes contain chemicals that aren’t safe for kids— including food dyes linked to ADHD and hyperactivity. But in minutes you can make dyes from frozen fruits and veggies that are already in your freezer. […]

  7. […] meals, try to reduce their BPA exposure by using more reusable water bottles and less canned foods, avoid food dyes and other artificial ingredients, pack their beach bags with zinc-based sunscreen, […]

  8. […] meals, try to reduce their BPA exposure by using more reusable water bottles and less canned foods, avoid food dyes and other artificial ingredients, pack their beach bags with zinc-based sunscreen, […]

  9. […] lashes, thank you Mr. Makeup Artist—I’m still royally pissed about food dyes. The fact is, American kids eat snacks tainted with food dyes linked to hyperactivity, while in Europe—where food dyes are required to be labeled—the same food is manufactured […]

  10. […] simply with 10 ingredients—no artificial flavors, colors or sweeteners, not to mention antibiotics or synthetic hormones—Sneakz Organic healthy chocolate milkshakes […]

  11. […] healthier for kids. Many egg dyes contain chemicals that aren’t safe for kids— including food dyes linked to ADHD and hyperactivity. But in minutes you can make dyes from frozen fruits and veggies that are already in your freezer. […]

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